Physical amplifications - PsychonautWiki

Physical amplifications

(Redirected from Physical enhancements)

Physical amplifications are defined as any effect which intensifies a facet of one's physical body.

This page lists and describes the various physical amplifications which can occur under the influence of certain psychoactive compounds such as psychedelics.

Appetite intensification

Appetite intensification (also known as "the munchies") can be described as the experience of a distinct increase in a person's sense of hunger and appetite. This results in both an increased desire to eat food and an increased enjoyment of its taste.

Appetite intensification is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of orexigenic compounds, such as cannabinoids,[1] mirtazapine,[2] and quetiapine. However, it may also occur under the influence of other compounds such as GABAergic depressants, tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), tetracyclic antidepressants, first-generation antihistamines, most antipsychotics, and many steroid hormones.

Bodily control enhancement

Bodily control enhancement can be described as feeling as if there has been a distinct increase in a person's ability to control their physical body with precision, balance, coordination, and dexterity. This results in the feeling that they can accurately control a much greater variety of muscles across their body with the tiniest of subtle mental triggers.

The experience of this effect is often subjectively interpreted by people as a profound and primal feeling of being put back in touch with the animal body.

Bodily control enhancement is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of stimulating psychedelics, such as LSD, 2C-B, and DOC. However, it may also occur to a lesser extent under the influence of other compounds such as traditional stimulants and light dosages of stimulating dissociatives.

Increased libido

Main article: Increased libido

Increased libido can be described as a distinct increase in feelings of sexual desire, the anticipation of sexual activity, and the likelihood that a person will view the context of a given situation as sexual in nature.[3][4] When experienced, this sensation is not overwhelming or out of control, but simply remains something that one is constantly aware of.

Increased libido is often accompanied by other coinciding effects such as tactile intensification, and stimulation in a manner which can lead to greatly intensified feelings of sexual pleasure. It is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of stimulant compounds, particularly dopaminergic stimulants such as methamphetamine[5] and cocaine[6]. However, it may also occur under the influence of other compounds such as GABAergic depressants and psychedelics.

Increased respiration

Main article: Increased respiration

Increased respiration

Stamina intensification

Stamina intensification can be described as an increased ability to engage in physically and mentally taxing activities without the development of fatigue. Although this effect is commonly mistaken for stimulation, it differs as it is not a direct increase in one's energy levels. Instead, it is an increase in one's resilience in performing an activity combined with a mitigation of general fatigue.

Psychoactive substances that directly increase a person's endurance without stimulation are known as actoprotectors. These are defined as "substances that enhance body stability against physical or mental loads without increasing oxygen consumption or heat production."[7] Although actoprotectors are extremely uncommon, there are many compounds which are capable of inducing stamina intensification alongside other effects such as stimulation, focus intensification, and motivation enhancement. These commonly include most stimulants such as amphetamine[8] and specific psychedelics[9] such as LSD.

Stimulation

Main article: Stimulation

Stimulation can be described as an increase in a person's physical energy levels which are interpreted as encouraging when it comes to wakefulness, movement, performing tasks, talkativeness, and general exercise.[10]

At lower levels, stimulation typically presents itself as encouraged more so than forced. This can be described as feeling distinctly energetic, but in a purely controllable fashion that does not overwhelm the person with involuntary movements should they choose to stop expending large amounts of energy. It is often accompanied by other coinciding effects such as motivation enhancement, analysis enhancement, thought acceleration, focus enhancement, and appetite suppression in a manner which can result in a distinct increase in the person's overall productivity.

At higher levels, stimulation typically presents itself as forced more so than encouraged. This can be described as the effects of increased energy becoming so pronounced that the person will be incapable of relaxing and will feel an irresistible urge to perform some sort of physical task. It is often accompanied by other coinciding effects such as thought disorganization, focus suppression, short term memory suppression, increased heart rate, teeth grinding, temporary erectile dysfunction, sweating, and dehydration in a manner which can lead to lead to a distinct decrease in the person's overall productivity.

Stimulation is most commonly induced under the influence of moderate dosages of stimulant compounds, particularly dopaminergic stimulants such as amphetamine, methylphenidate, MDMA, and cocaine. However, it may also occur under the influence of other compounds such as certain psychedelics and certain dissociatives.

See also

References

  1. Berry, E. M., Mechoulam, R. (August 2002). "Tetrahydrocannabinol and endocannabinoids in feeding and appetite". Pharmacology & Therapeutics. 95 (2): 185–190. doi:10.1016/S0163-7258(02)00257-7. ISSN 0163-7258. 
  2. Montgomery, S. A. (1 December 1995). "Safety of mirtazapine: a review". International clinical psychopharmacology. 10 Suppl 4: 37–45. doi:10.1097/00004850-199512004-00006. ISSN 1473-5857. 
  3. Makwana, S., Solanki, M., Raloti, S., Dikshit, R. (2013). "Evaluation of Recreational Use of Aphrodisiac Drugs and Its Consequences: An Online Questionnaire Based Study" (PDF). Int J Res Med. 2 (1): 51–59. ISSN 2320-2742. 
  4. Sandroni, P. (October 2001). "Aphrodisiacs past and present: A historical review". Clinical Autonomic Research. 11 (5): 303–307. doi:10.1007/BF02332975. ISSN 0959-9851. 
  5. Shahram, Vaziri, Kashani F, Lotfi (1 January 2010). "Effects Of Methamphetamine And Narcotics On The Increase Of Libido And Reckless Sexual Behavior". 4 (15): 81–91. 
  6. Macdonald, P. T., Waldorf, D., Reinarman, C., Murphy, S. (July 1988). "Heavy Cocaine Use and Sexual Behavior". Journal of Drug Issues. 18 (3): 437–455. doi:10.1177/002204268801800309. ISSN 0022-0426. 
  7. Oliynyk, S., Oh, S. (September 2012). "The Pharmacology of Actoprotectors: Practical Application for Improvement of Mental and Physical Performance". Biomolecules & Therapeutics. 20 (5): 446–456. doi:10.4062/biomolther.2012.20.5.446. ISSN 1976-9148. 
  8. Morozova, E., Yoo, Y., Behrouzvaziri, A., Zaretskaia, M., Rusyniak, D., Zaretsky, D., Molkov, Y. (September 2016). "Amphetamine enhances endurance by increasing heat dissipation". Physiological Reports. 4 (17): e12955. doi:10.14814/phy2.12955. ISSN 2051-817X. 
  9. Oroc, J. "Psychedelics and Extreme Sports" (PDF). MAPS Bulletin. 21 (1): 25–29. 
  10. Treatment, C. for S. A. (1999). Chapter 2—How Stimulants Affect the Brain and Behavior. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (US).